Protocols and Guidelines

All UNSW Arts & Social Sciences students are required to follow UNSW Academic Policies and UNSW Arts & Social Sciences Guidelines and Protocols while they are enrolled in their program.

Details on UNSW Academic Policies are available at UNSW Policies, Procedures and Guidelines.

We encourage you to regularly to check your UNSW cloud email and myUNSW to ensure you are familiar with the latest UNSW student guidelines and policies.

UNSW policies

  • Program leave and discontinuation
    To ensure that you maintain standing in your program, you must formally apply for program leave through your student profile in myUNSW. For more information, visit the program leave web page.
  • Results
    For more information about how to access your assessment results, why results may be withheld and how to get a review of results, visit the results web page.
  • Special consideration (illness and misadventure)
    Sickness, misadventure or other circumstance beyond your control may prevent you from completing a course requirement or may significantly affect your performance in assessable work. You can apply for consideration for the affected assessments through your student profile in myUNSW. For more information, see special consideration.
  • Special permission to withdraw from a course without penalty
    To withdraw from a course after both the census date and the withdrawal without academic penalty date have passed, you need special permission. Applications must be made through your student profile in myUNSW. For more information, see the fee remission (special consideration) web page.
  • Student code of conduct
    The overarching obligation of all students is to act in the best interests of the University community at all times. For more information, see student conduct.

Arts & Social Sciences procedures

Arts & Social Sciences late submissions guidelines

Guidelines for late penalties for student work submitted after due date

Students are responsible for the submission of assessment tasks by the required dates and times. Depending of the extent of delay in the submission of an assessment task past the due date and time, one of the following late penalties will apply unless special consideration or a blanket extension due to a technical outage is granted. For the purpose of late penalty calculation, a ‘day’ is deemed to be each 24-hour period (or part thereof) past the stipulated deadline for submission.

  • Work submitted less than 10 days after the stipulated deadline is subject to a deduction of 5% of the total awardable mark from the mark that would have been achieved if not for the penalty for every day past the stipulated deadline for submission. That is, a student who submits an assignment with a stipulated deadline of 4:00pm on 13 May 2018 at 4:10pm on 14 May 2018 will incur a deduction of 10%.

Task with a non-percentage mark

If the task is marked out of 25, then late submission will attract a penalty of a deduction of 1.25 from the mark awarded to the student for every 24-hour period (or part thereof) past the stipulated deadline.

Example: A student submits an essay 48 hours and 10 minutes after the stipulated deadline. The total possible mark for the essay is 25. The essay receives a mark of 17. The student’s mark is therefore 17 – [25 (0.05 x 3)] = 13.25

Task with a percentage mark

If the task is marked out of 100%, then late submission will attract a penalty of a deduction of 5% from the mark awarded to the student for every 24-hour period (or part thereof) past the stipulated deadline.

Example: A student submits an essay 48 hours and 10 minutes after the stipulated deadline. The essay is marked out of 100%. The essay receives a mark of 68. The student’s mark is therefore 68 – 15 = 53

  • Work submitted 10 to 19 days after the stipulated deadline will be assessed and feedback provided but a mark of zero will be recorded. If the work would have received a pass mark but for the lateness and the work is a compulsory course component (hurdle requirement), a student will be deemed to have met that requirement;
  • Work submitted 20 or more days after the stipulated deadline will not be accepted for assessment and will receive no feedback, mark or grade. If the assessment task is a compulsory component of the course a student will receive an Unsatisfactory Fail (UF) grade as a result of unsatisfactory performance in an essential component of the course.

Arts & Social Sciences student work review guidelines

These guidelines apply to all students enrolled in undergraduate or postgraduate courses taught by the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

These guidelines apply to all assessed tasks.

Seeking informal clarification

  • There is no automatic right to have an assessment reviewed, the Faculty reserves the right to make such judgements.
  • In the first instance a student should seek an informal clarification, this should normally be done within two working days of the return of the assessed work.

Completing a Review of Results application form

  • If the student is not satisfied with the informal process, they should complete the UNSW Review of Results (RoR) application form.
  • A RoR application must be lodged within 15 working days of receiving the result of the assessment task.
  • A clean copy and a copy of the marked work with all feedback must be submitted with the RoR application.
  • The student must provide a written explanation of why they believe the work requires review. The written explanation must include the stated criteria for the assessment task indicating the exact area(s) where the assessment of their work differs from what they have received.
  • The Course Authority has the option to not recommend if they deem the grounds are insufficient.
  • The Course Authority will make their decision within three working days of receiving the request.
  • If the Courses Authority approves the review, the student will submit the RoR application form to Student Central. An administration fee applies.

Head of School

  • If the Course Authority does not recommend the review but the student believes that the mark/grade does not reflect their performance, the student may forward the RoR application form to the Head of School or their delegated representative.
  • The Head of School (HoS) will make their decision within three working days of receiving the application.
  • If the HoS approves the review, the student will submit the application to Student Central.

Faculty Assessment Review Group

  • If the HoS does not approve the review, they will notify the Chair of the Faculty Assessment Review Group (FARG).
  • The FARG can either endorse or overturn the decision of the HoS.
  • The FARG will make a decision within one week of receiving advice from the HoS.
  • The student will be advised of the review decision by email from Student Administration and Records.

Arts & Social Sciences attendance and absence guidelines

Attendance and Absence

The UNSW Policy on Class Attendance and Absence can be viewed at: https://student.unsw.edu.au/attendance

From time to time, the Course Authority may vary the attendance requirements for a course. It is the students’ responsibility to ensure that they are familiar with the specific attendance requirements stipulated in the course outline for each course in which they are enrolled.

Attendance

Students are expected to be regular and punctual in attendance at all classes in the courses in which they are enrolled. Where courses stipulate mandatory attendance requirements students who seek to be excused from attendance [or for absence] must apply to the Course Authority in writing.

Explanations of absences from classes or requests for permission to be absent from forthcoming classes should be addressed to the Course Authority in writing and, where applicable, should be accompanied by appropriate documentation (e.g. medical certificate). After submitting appropriate supporting documentation to the Course Authority to explain his/her absence, a student may be required to undertake supplementary class(s) or task(s) as prescribed by the Course Authority. If examinations or other forms of assessment have been missed, then the student should apply for Special Consideration.

Course Authorities must:

  • Identify in the course outline classes subject to attendance requirements
  • Keep accurate records to facilitate the enforcement of the specified attendance requirements. To ensure adequate responses to student appeals and complaints, attendance records are to be centrally stored within each school and accessible (e.g. by the Deputy Head of School or Associate Dean (Education)) for a minimum of 7 years after the completion of the course.
  • Enforce the specified attendance requirements through the application of consequence where appropriate.

Bachelor of Education Students - Participation and enrolment requirements by NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA)

For accreditation as a teacher in NSW, all teacher education students will need to meet the following participation and enrolment requirements set by the NSW Educations Standards Authority (NESA).

Assessment of Suitability for Teaching

It is a NESA requirement that all UNSW Bachelor of Education students successfully complete a full year (48 UOC) of studies in their specific disciplinary content area (e.g., Maths, Science, Economics, Arts, etc.) before undertaking any discipline-specific curriculum and pedagogic studies (Methods) or professional experience placements in schools. From 2019, at the end of their first term they must also complete a motivational statement as to why they want to be a teacher, which is scored on a 2-point scale: No – incoherent, irrelevant, or inappropriate reasons, or Yes - coherent and valid reason. If students score ‘No’, they will be counselled out of the program.

In addition, before their first supervised professional experience placement, all teacher education students must successfully complete:

1. The National Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education.

2. The Classroom Readiness Questionnaire. The Classroom Readiness Questionnaire is a pre-professional experience self-assessment tool that requires students to provide evidence of success across six areas (subject content, inherent requirements, professional language/literacy/numeracy, oral communication, classroom management, and commitment to the profession). Their self-assessments are then endorsed (or not) by at least two staff members who teach them.

3. A situational judgement test. This test is a scenario-based measurement tool designed to assess individuals’ judgement in a contextualised workplace setting. This test evaluates a number of key non-academic capabilities deemed necessary for teaching (e.g., adaptability, empathy).

We also undertake extensive evaluation of teacher suitability for their specific teaching areas. We do this via: (a) including a compulsory microteaching assessment in Methods courses, (b) using direct observation of all professional experience placements, including the Term 1 placement as a teaching assistant, (c) multiple critical assessment tasks, (d) a teaching performance assessment, and (e) a set of inherent requirements used by a range of UNSW teacher education providers. We continually monitor and evaluate the relationship between these measures, the performance during professional experience, and graduate outcomes, including level of self-efficacy.

English Language Proficiency

It is a NESA requirement that all teacher education students have very high levels of English language proficiency, thus in addition to satisfying UNSW entry requirements, see www.unsw.edu.au/english-requirements-policy, oral and written communication skills are assessed regularly as part of all coursework and professional experience.

The National Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education (LANTITE)

The LANTITE is designed to assess initial teacher education students’ personal literacy and numeracy skills to ensure teachers are well equipped to meet the demands of teaching, and assist higher education providers, teacher employers, and the general public to have increased confidence in the skills of graduating teachers.

The test has been introduced to assess those aspects of initial teacher education students’ personal literacy and numeracy skills that can be measured through an online assessment tool. At UNSW, students must successfully complete both components of the LANTITE test prior to enrolling in their first Professional Experience course. You are supplied with information for the tests though Moodle and the link is provided at https://teacheredtest.acer.edu.au. Successful completion of the LANTITE test will be recorded as two zero credit courses, EDST6600 LANTITE (Literacy) and EDST6601 LANTITE (Numeracy) on a student’s academic record.

Proficiency in Languages Other than English

Teacher education students undertaking a major or extended minor stream in a language other than English (e.g., Chinese) as a first or additional teaching specialisation may be asked to take an additional assessment of their language other than English skills before being permitted to enrol in the relevant language teaching specialisation (i.e., Method). This is to ensure that they have the necessary language competence, including both spoken and written language, to teach the target language at HSC level in NSW schools.

Working With Children Check

Before their first professional experience placement, all teacher education students must obtain a current Volunteer Working With Children Check (WWC) and attend a UNSW-based 2-hour child protection lecture delivered by the Department of Education – Employee Performance and Conduct Directorate. They must provide a copy of their WWC clearance number to the Professional Experience Office (PEO) via the Online Placement System (OPS). The PEO verifies all WWC numbers in the Office of the Children’s Guardian verification page for employers (https://wwccheck.ccyp.nsw.gov.au/Employers/Login) and classifies students as ‘eligible’ for placement, or not. All EDST 6765 Professional Experience 2 students must then obtain a valid paid WWC clearance. For more information about volunteer and paid WWC Checks, find the link here: https://www.kidsguardian.nsw.gov.au/child-safe-organisations/working-with-children-check

All students must also familiarise themselves with the NSW Department of Education Code of Conduct and the document Responding to Allegations against Employees in the Area of Child Protection. All students are provided access to the policy via the Professional Experience Handbook specific to their year of placement.

Anaphylaxis Training & Certification

The NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) and the Department of Education (DoE) has mandated the completion of anaphylaxis e-training for all permanent, temporary, and casual employees who work in schools, including teacher education students. All UNSW teacher education students must complete the anaphylaxis e-training module provided by the Australian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) in conjunction with practice using an adrenaline auto-injector training device prior to commencing their first placement in schools.

The e-training is a free. The online module available at http://etraining.allergy.org.au/. On successful completion of the online module, participants will receive a certificate of completion which should be printed immediately. The Professional Experience Office will then arrange practice using the adrenaline auto-injector training device. Students are then required to upload their signed certificate to the OPS. NESA and the DoE require that students also present a copy of their certificate of completion to principals at the commencement of their professional experience placements. Students should also retain a copy of the certificate for future use within the two years of the certificate’s currency.

The NSW DoE advises that student teachers who do not successfully complete this training, as verified by the university and the principal of their placement school, will not be able to undertake professional experience activities in NSW public schools. The training is required to be successfully undertaken every two years. This is the only training that will be accepted by the DoE to meet the requirement of anaphylaxis training for initial Teacher Education Students.

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Master of Teaching (Primary) and Master of Teaching (Secondary) – Participation and enrolment requirements by NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA)

Assessment of Suitability for Teaching

It is a NESA requirement that before entry all UNSW Master of Teaching students complete a motivational statement as to why they want to be a teacher, which is scored on a 2-point scale, No– incoherent, irrelevant or inappropriate reasons, Yes - coherent and valid reason. If students score No, they are counselled out of the program.

In addition, before their first supervised professional experience placement, all teacher education students must successfully complete:

1. The National Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education.

2. The Classroom Readiness Questionnaire. The Classroom Readiness Questionnaire is a pre-professional experience self-assessment tool that requires students to provide evidence of success across six areas (subject content, inherent requirements, professional language/literacy/numeracy, oral communication, classroom management, and commitment to the profession). Their self-assessments are then endorsed (or not) by at least two staff members who teach them.

3. A situational judgement test. This test is a scenario-based measurement tool designed to assess individuals’ judgement in a contextualised workplace setting. This test evaluates a number of key non-academic capabilities deemed necessary for teaching (e.g., adaptability, empathy).

We also undertake extensive evaluation of teacher suitability for their specific teaching areas. We do this via: (a) including a compulsory microteaching assessment in Methods courses, (b) using direct observation of all professional experience placements, including the Term 1 placement as a teaching assistant, (c) multiple critical assessment tasks, (d) a teaching performance assessment, and (e) a set of inherent requirements used by a range of UNSW teacher education providers. We continually monitor and evaluate the relationship between these measures, the performance during professional experience, and graduate outcomes, including level of self-efficacy.

English Language Proficiency

It is a NESA requirement that all teacher education students have very high levels of English language proficiency, thus in addition to satisfying UNSW entry requirements, see www.unsw.edu.au/english-requirements-policy, oral and written communication skills are assessed regularly as part of all coursework and professional experience. By graduation it is expected that all teacher education students will be able to demonstrate English language proficiency equivalent to a Band 5 NSW HSC- level or an IELTS 7.5, with 8.0 for speaking and listening.

The National Literacy and Numeracy Test

The National Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education Students is designed to assess initial teacher education students’ personal literacy and numeracy skills to ensure teachers are well equipped to meet the demands of teaching and assist higher education providers, teacher employers and the general public to have increased confidence in the skills of graduating teachers.

The test has been introduced to assess those aspects of initial teacher education students’ personal literacy and numeracy skills that can be measured through an online assessment tool. At UNSW, you must successfully complete both components of the LANTITE test prior to enrolling in your first Professional Experience course. You are supplied with information for the tests though Moodle and the link is provided at https://teacheredtest.acer.edu.au. Successful completion of the LANTITE test will be recorded as two zero credit courses, EDST6600 LANTITE (Literacy) and EDST6601 LANTITE (Numeracy) on a student’s academic record.

Working With Children Check

Before their first professional experience placement all teacher education students must obtain a current Volunteer Working With Children Check and attend a UNSW-based 2 hour child protection lecture delivered by the Department of Education – Employee Performance and Conduct Directorate. They must provide a copy of their WWC clearance number to the Professional Experience Office (PEO) via the Online Placement System (OPS). The PEO verifies all WWC numbers in the Office of the Children’s Guardian verification page for employers (https://wwccheck.ccyp.nsw.gov.au/Employers/Login) and classifies students as ‘eligible’ for placement. All EDST 6765 Professional Experience 2 students must then obtain a valid paid WWC clearance.

All students must also familiarise themselves with the NSW Department of Education Code of Conduct and the document Responding to Allegations against Employees in the Area of Child Protection. All students are provided access to the policy via the Professional Experience Handbook specific to their year of placement.

Anaphylaxis Training & Certification

The NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) and the Department of Education (DoE) has mandated the completion of anaphylaxis e-training for all permanent, temporary and casual employees who work in schools, including teacher education students. All UNSW teacher education students must complete the anaphylaxis e-training module provided by the Australian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) in conjunction with practice using an adrenaline autoinjector training device prior to commencing their first placement in schools.

The e-training is a free, online module available at http://etraining.allergy.org.au/. On successful completion of the online module, participants will receive a certificate of completion which should be printed immediately. The Professional Experience Office will then arrange practice using the adrenaline auto-injector training device. Students are then required to upload their signed certificate to the OPS. NESA and the DoE require that students also present a copy of their certificate of completion to principals at the commencement of their professional experience placements. Students should also retain a copy of the certificate for future use within the two years of the certificate’s currency.

The NSW DoE advises that student teachers who do not successfully complete this training, as verified by the university and the principal of their placement school, will not be able to undertake professional experience activities in NSW public schools. The training is required to be successfully undertaken every two years. This is the only training that will be accepted by the DoE to meet the requirement of anaphylaxis training for initial Teacher Education Students.

Cross-Institutional Study/Intensive Exchange

• The maximum limit for cross-institutional study/intensive exchange is 12 units of credit.

• Cross-institutional study/intensive exchange can only be undertaken after completing at least 48 units of credit.

• You should have at least a credit average and no more than one fail (Academic Withdrawal (AW) is considered the same way as a failure) if you are undertaking overseas cross-institutional study/intensive exchange.

• The discipline (specialisation) is appropriate to your program.

• The course content is not taught at UNSW; or

• You are unable to enrol in UNSW course for good reason, for example, failed a UNSW prerequisite course which might impact on your progression in your program.

• Core courses must be completed at UNSW and cannot be substituted for a cross-institutional course/intensive exchange.

• Credit for study will not be granted if the cross-institutional study/intensive exchange was not approved prior to your study

Credit Transfer

Students admitted with credit transfer are given credit towards the degree for all appropriate courses up to a maximum of two thirds of the total units of credit required for each degree.

Credit transfer will not be granted for courses completed more than 10 years previously. Students seeking credit transfer for courses completed elsewhere must submit documentary evidence and specify the courses they wish to complete within the Faculty. Faculty will then determine the number of units of credit to be granted.

A student who has been granted credit transfer for courses in their major or minor sequence is required to complete the following at UNSW:

Major sequence – complete at least 18 units of credit at UNSW, including the capstone course, if applicable

Minor sequence of 24 units of credit – complete at least 6 units of credit at UNSW

Extended minor sequence of 36 units of credit – complete at least 12 units of credit UNSW

Limitations on Student Exchange Program

1. Maximum exchange period for students in double degrees

1.1 A one-year exchange is the maximum period allowed by the UNSW International Exchange rules, with the exception of the International Studies double degrees (for example, International Studies/Law or International Studies/Media) where students can undertake an additional 18 uoc - 24 uoc for their degree other than International Studies.

1.2 Students in Arts and Social Sciences double degrees with an external faculty (for example, Arts/Law or Science/Arts) are limited to 18 uoc - 24 uoc.

1.3 Students in Arts and Social Sciences double degrees within the Faculty can participate in a one-year exchange program (48 uoc) but cannot count more than 24 uoc towards each degree. However, in some programs such as Arts/Education (Secondary), the core courses cannot be completed on exchange. This may limit the period of exchange in some dual degrees to 18 uoc - 24 uoc.

2. Exchange Program in the final term of study

Students undertaking an exchange program in their final term of study must bring back credit transfer of at least 18 uoc, that is, the equivalent full-time load per term at UNSW.

Enrolment Overload Conditions

Arts and Social Sciences students must meet the following conditions to overload:

  • Completed at least 48 uoc overall
  • Completed a full course load (18 uoc) in the previous term*
  • Good academic standing
  • 65 WAM overall

*Please note if you are applying to overload for Term 1 2019, you will need to have completed 24 uoc in Semester 2 2018.

Applications to overload are only considered for the following term. Applications will be assessed after the official result release of the current term. You will be notified of the outcome of your application through your student email.

Permissible Timetable Clashes

The Faculty allows permissible timetable clashes only in certain circumstances:

a) The timetable clash can only be between lectures or between a lecture and a tutorial or seminar. Only

the lecture can be missed.

b) Where the clash is between two lectures the course convenor will determine whether full waiver of

attendance or partial attendance is permitted.

c) A timetable clash will not be granted when the clash is the result of overloading.

d) Timetable clashes are not available to students in their first term of study at University.

e) You take full responsibility for the timetable clash and ensure that you meet the course learning

outcomes.

h) All timetable clash requests must be submitted using the Timetable Clash Request Form


If your permissible timetable clash request is approved you must fulfil the following requirements:

a) You must attend the clashed lecture on a specific date if that lecture contains an assessment task for the

course such as a quiz or test. If you miss the said lecture there is no obligation on the Course Convenor to

schedule a make-up quiz or test and you can receive zero for the assessment task. It should be noted that

in many courses a failure to complete an assessment task can be grounds for course failure.

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