Events, Presentations, Publications & Submissions

Events

Investigating the deaths of intellectually disabled people: reflections on the #JusticeforLB campaign

Time: 15 November 2017, 4.00pm - 5.30pm

Location: Room 221/223, Level 2, John Goodsell Building, UNSW Kensington Campus

More information: https://www.arts.unsw.edu.au/events/investigating-the-deaths-of-intellectually-disabled-people/

Presentations

Staff from Intellectual Disability Behaviour Support (IDBS) program have presented at a number of conferences.

If you wish to know more about these presentations please contact the nominated presenter.


Australia’s National Disability Insurance Scheme, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK

30 September 2016

  • What’s New Down Under for People with Learning Disabilities presented by Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au)


Australian Systemic Functional Linguistics Conference, Sydney

27 September 2016

  • A linguist in the disability sector: understanding the meaning of ‘support’ as part of the ‘Interrogating ‘Support” as a key concept in disability, presented by Dr Shoshana Dreyfus (email: s.dreyfus@unsw.edu.au)


ADHC New England Behaviour Support and Case Management Conference, Armidale

20 September 2016

  • Planning with People with Complex Support Needs, was presented by Angela Dew (Email: a.dew@unsw.edu.au)


AVAWA/Our Watch Prevalent and Preventable Violence against Women and their Children Conference, Adelaide

19-22 September 2016

“Why words matter: defining prevention of violence against women” and “Accountability as prevention? Translating international frameworks into local spaces” was presented by Dr Aminath Didi (Email: a.didi@unsw.edu.au)


NSW Australasian Society for Intellectual Disability (ASID)

29 August 2016

"Self Determination and Individualised Funding forum" was presented by Dr Angela Dew (Email: a.dew@unsw.edu.au)


Complexity and Belonging Forum, Deakin Deakin University, Geelong

20 August 2016

  • “Building capacity for people with cognitive disability and complex support needs: A Circles of Support approach”, presented by Angela Dew (Email: a.dew@unsw.edu.au) and Susan Collings (Email: susan.collings@unsw.edu.au)

IASSIDD Academy Workshop, Melbourne

19 August 2016


IASSIDD World Congress, Melbourne

15-18 August 2016

A number of papers were presented by the IDBS team at the conference, including:

  • Dowse, L & Smith, L. “The support planning/complexity nexus”.
  • Didi, A, Dowse, L & Smith, L “Human rights perspective: implications for policy and practice”.
  • Collings, S & Dew, A “A Planning Approach for Individuals with Complex Support Needs.”
  • Dew, A., Mayes, R., Bundy, A., Bulkeley, K., Lincoln, M., Iljadica, A., & Gallego, G. “Therapy Support Workers: Building family and community capacity to help rural Aboriginal children with developmental delay transition to school.”
  • Gilroy, J., & Dew, A. “Speaking Up about Disability: disability research methodologies on the NPY Lands.”
  • Hogan, L., & Dew, A. “Arts-based knowledge translation for direct support professionals.”
  • Curryer, B., Stancliffe, R., Dew, A., & Wiese, M. “Family Relationships and support for self-determination: The lived experience of adults with intellectual disabilities.” (Oral paper).
  • Curryer, B., Stancliffe, R., Dew, A., & Wiese, M. “Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Choice and control within the context of family relationships” (Poster – Winner in category).
  • Collings, S. “Formal Service Support for Children of Parents with Intellectual Disability”.
  • Collings, S & Spencer, M. “Creating Positive Change for Parents with Intellectual Disability”.

Ethical Issues in Ageing Forum, University of Sydney

12 August 2016

  • ‘The Family Perspective’, was presented by Amgela Dew (Email: a.dew@unsw.edu.au)

Network of Alcohol and Other Drugs (NADA) Conference

6-7th June 2016


CCWT Disability Justice Project Leaders Breakfast

9th June 2016


Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia conference
9-12th December 2015, Sydney

  • Gendered disability violence: Complexity, intersectionality and paradox, presented by Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au)

Off the Grid: Intellectual Disability, Complexity and the NDIS
27th November 2015, Brisbane

  • Support for people with complex needs who do not have an individual NDIS funding package, presented by Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au)

TASA Conference
23-26th November, 2015, Cairns

  • What does support look like? Defining ‘support’ in the context of intellectual disability and the NDIS, presented by Louisa Smith (Email: louisa.smith@unsw.edu.au)

National Complex Needs Conference
17-18th November 2015, Canberra

  • IDBS Complex Support Needs Symposium: People with Intellectual Disability and Complex Support Needs: Exploring the challenges in thinking, working and communicating.
    • Framing Complex Support Needs in Theory, Policy and Practice, presented by Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au) and Louisa Smith (Email: louisa.smith@unsw.edu.au)
    • What is effective support planning for people with complex support needs? Presented by Susan Collings (Email: susan.collings@unsw.edu.au)
    • Knowledge Translation planning in a complex support needs environment, presented by Angela Dew (Email: a.dew@unsw.edu.au)


Australasian Society for Study of Intellectual Disability (ASID)
11-13th November 2015, Melbourne

  • IDBS Complex Support Needs Symposium: People with Intellectual Disability and Complex Support Needs: Exploring the challenges in thinking, working and communicating.
    • Framing Complex Support Needs in Theory, Policy and Practice, presented by Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au) and Louisa Smith (Email: louisa.smith@unsw.edu.au)
    • What is effective support planning for people with complex support needs? Presented by Susan Collings (Email: susan.collings@unsw.edu.au)
    • Knowledge Translation planning in a complex support needs environment, presented by Angela Dew (Email: a.dew@unsw.edu.au)
    • Representation of people with intellectual disabilities in Australian mental health policy, presented by Angela Dew (Email: a.dew@unsw.edu.au)
    • Understanding the gendered disability violence at the intersections of criminalisation and victimisation, presented by Leanne Dowse l.dowse@unsw.edu.au
    • A predictable and preventable path: Views from Aboriginal people and communities, presented by Leanne Dowse l.dowse@unsw.edu.au
    • Representation of people with intellectual disabilities in Australian mental health policy, presented by Angela Dew a.dew@unsw.edu.au


NHMRC Knowledge Translation Symposium
27-28th October 2015, Sydney

  • Establishing a KT plan in a complex support needs environment, poster presentation by Angela Dew (Email: a.dew@unsw.edu.au)

Designing and Delivering Mental Health Services within the NDIS: Preparing for national rollout
21 October 2015, Sydney

  • Support for people with complex needs deemed ineligible for NDIS funding package, presented by Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au)

Australian Social Policy Conference
28-30th September 2015, UNSW

  • IDBS Complex Support Needs Symposium: People with Intellectual Disability and Complex Support Needs: Exploring the challenges in thinking, working and communicating.
    • Framing Complex Support Needs in Theory, Policy and Practice, presented by Louisa Smith (Email: louisa.smith@unsw.edu.au)
    • Effective support planning for people with complex support needs, presented by Susan Collings (Email: susan.collings@unsw.edu.au)
    • Knowledge Translation planning in a complex support needs environment, presented by Angela Dew (Email: a.dew@unsw.edu.au)


Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science and Swinburne University, Young people and the law: International approaches to care, corrections and intervention
21st -23rd September 2015 Prato, Italy

  • Understanding complex support needs in young people with cognitive disability in contact with the criminal justice system, presented by Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au)


Ending Domestic Violence: Improving primary prevention, early intervention and response
10-11 June 2015, Sydney

  • Preventing violence against women and girls with disabilities
  • Integrating a Human Rights perspective, presented by Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au) and Aminath Didi (Email: a.didi@unsw.edu.au)

Sydney Wide Behaviour Support Conference
22 April 2015, Lidcombe

  • Challenges and opportunities: The Changing nature of behaviour support services for individuals with complex support needs in NSW, presented by Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au)

Roundtable on NDIS Quality and Safeguarding Framework Meeting
27 March 2015, Sydney


Inaugural Asia-Pacific Conference on Gendered Violence and Violations
10-12 February 2015, UNSW

  • Understanding and identifying gendered disability violence, presented by Karen Soldatic, Jo Spangaro and Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au )
  • Working for policy change to address gendered disability violence, presented by Aminath Didi (Email: a.didi@unsw.edu.au), Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@undsw.edu.au), and Karen Soldatic
  • Complex Intersections: disability, gender, violence and criminalisation, presented by Leanne Dowse (Email: l.dowse@unsw.edu.au), Karen Soldatic and Aminath Didi (Email: a.didi@unsw.edu.au )

Peer-reviewed Journal Articles

Who is diverted? Moving beyond diagnosed impairment towards a social and political analysis of diversion.

Steele, L., Dowse, L., & Trofimovs, J. (2016). Sydney Law Review, 38, 179-206.


More, Better or Different? NDIS workforce planning for people with intellectual disability and complex support needs.

“…the most urgent imperatives are a workforce that is skilled to meet the support needs of the client group, is stable to enable critical professional–client relationship building, and is available in the geographical location of the client group”

The key issues addressed in this publication:

Is the workforce being built according to need?

Can the mainstream realistically support people with complex support needs?

The need for a national workforce and client population audit

Summary text

The IDBS team has for some time been concerned that the exponential NDIS workforce growth has taken little account of the particular needs of people with intellectual disability and complex support needs. Recently we wrote an article about this in the Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, arguing the imperative for a workforce to match the support needs of this group.

Using both the scientific literature and reports produced by governments and disability sector agencies, we proposed that people with intellectual disability and complex support needs will likely represent a significant proportion of NDIS participants, not just in numbers, but also the extent of service need. We found that so far, NDIS workforce planning and discussion has focussed on ensuring competent and safe staff, retaining the workforce, becoming an employer of choice, and recruiting in a climate of decreased labour availability. While few would argue the importance of these issues, we suggested that little attention has been given to understanding the NDIS participant profile and then building the workforce accordingly.

We presented a proposed outline of the skill set required to adequately support NDIS participants with intellectual disability and complex support needs, and argued that mainstream services and natural supports, upon which the NDIS heavily relies, do not have this skill set. We concluded that, without a planned workforce competent to meet their needs, people with intellectual disability and complex support needs may not fare well in the NDIS; an outcome that would contravene the Australian Government’s commitment to the human rights principles underpinning the NDIS.

The full journal article can be found at:

Dowse, L., Wiese, M., Dew, A., Smith, L., Collings, S., & Didi, A. (2016). More, better or different? NDIS workforce planning for people with intellectual disability and complex support needs. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 41(1), 81-84. DOI: 10.3109/13668250.2015.1125868



Support Planning with people with intellectual disability and complex support needs in the Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme

Support planning is a critical step in ensuring that people with disability identify their goals and get the supports they need under the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). In this article we explore the challenges of conducting support planning with people with intellectual disability and complex support needs (CSN). This group often face challenges in accessing the services and supports they need because service and system models are too inflexible to respond to the breadth and depth of the person’s needs. We identify a range of barriers to this group engaging in NDIS planning. Barriers include: limited or negative past experiences with services; a lack of advocacy and support networks; difficulties in proving eligibility to the scheme; limited access to information, knowledge and skills to navigate the assessment process; and inexperience in identifying clear goals and aspirations. The skills of the NDIS planner will be crucial in reaching out to and engaging people with intellectual disability and CSN in the planning process. Additional time will also be required.

With the relevant subscription, you can access the article via the Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability. Alternatively, contact the IDBS team for further information on this publication idbs@unsw.edu.au

Collings, S., Dew, A., & Dowse, L. (2016) Support Planning with people with intellectual disability and complex support needs in the Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability DOI: 10.3109/13668250.2016.1151864



Essential priorities for an NDIS workforce ready for people with intellectual disability and complex support needs

“Time is of the essence if we are to prevent the very real potential for market failure…”

The key issues addressed in this publication:

Does the Australian disability sector know how many people have intellectual disability and complex support needs will participate in the NDIS?

What do we know about the predicted growth of the disability workforce in the NDIS?

How do we retain, replace, train and maintain the skills of the disability workforce during the transition to the NDIS so it is long-term equipped to support people with intellectual disability and complex support needs?

We propose:

A set of priority issues need be addressed if the NDIS is to build and maintain a workforce that can competently support people with intellectual disability and complex support needs.

Summary text:

The IDBS team at UNSW Australia recently wrote a paper that is published in Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. We aimed to open up debate about NDIS workforce planning, with particular reference to building a workforce capable of meeting the needs of prospective participants with complex support needs.

We used comparable population level data to argue that up to 100,000 Australians with intellectual disability may have complex support needs, and that they could represent about 55,000 of the total 490,000 eligible NDIS participant group.

We detailed the extent of current and future growth in the disability workforce, as well as the changing profile of marketplace service providers expected with the NDIS. We then used this data as a backdrop to outline the challenges for workforce development in the NDIS.

We argued the need for breadth and depth of professional skills, workforce training, and quality supervision and mentoring. We suggested that financial incentivisation must be addressed if the disability sector is to attract and maintain a workforce equipped to meet the needs of NDIS participants with intellectual disability and complex support needs.

The full journal article can be found at:

Dowse, L., Wiese, M., & Smith, L. (2016). Workforce issues in the Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme: Complex support needs ready? Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Advance online publication. 10.1080/23297018.2016.1161542


Disruptive, dangerous and disturbing: the ‘challenge’ of behaviour in the construction of normalcy and vulnerability

This paper explores the bio-medical association between challenging behaviour and categories of diagnosed impairment and offers an alternate reading of challenging behaviour as embodied, emergent, relational and historically contingent. Through the analysis of case studies, the significance of legal, social and clinical responses are examined. Theoretical conceptions of vulnerability are used to disentangle the legal and social responsibilities and interventions for people constructed as having challenging behaviour.

The full journal article can be found at:

Dowse, L. (2017) Disruptive, dangerous and disturbing: the ‘challenge’ of behaviour in the construction of normalcy and vulnerability, Journal of Media and Cultural Studies 31(3), 447-457

DOI: 10.1080/10304312.2016.1275148


“They need to be able to have walked in our shoes”: What people with intellectual disability say about National Disability Insurance Scheme planning

The majority of NDIS individualised funding recipients are people with intellectual disability. Person-centred planning under the NDIS involves an individual identifying their goals, preferences and support needs with a planner who determines the value of the funding package and devises strategies to implement the plan. This creates a potential challenge for people with intellectual disability, who are likely to require support with decision-making or communication.

We conducted focus groups with nine adults with intellectual disability living in an NDIS trial site to explore their perspectives of NDIS planning. Thematic analysis was used to explore the extent to which planning helped them exercise choice and the qualities they valued in a planner. Planning increased independence and social participation when a person developed a trusting relationship with a planner. Planners needed to have communication skills and sound knowledge of the service system as well as interpersonal attributes such as honesty and warmth to build trust. People with intellectual disability valued planners who demonstrated respect for their views, and an understanding of their unique needs.

The full journal article can be found at:

Collings, S., Dew, A., & Dowse, L. (2017): “They need to be able to have walked in our shoes”: What people with intellectual disability say about National Disability Insurance Scheme planning, Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability. DOI: 10.3109/13668250.2017.1287887


Knowledge translation: Bridging the disability research-to-practice gap

The emerging field of knowledge translation challenges researchers to think beyond traditional ways of producing and disseminating research to increase research integrity, uptake, and applicability. This article uses examples from two research projects to illustrate the authors’ application of a knowledge translation framework, the Knowledge to Action Process, along with a detailed knowledge translation plan. Knowledge translation is emerging in the disability field as an important approach in ensuring that research agendas and results are led by, and communicated in partnership with those with most to gain – people with disabilities, their support networks, and practitioners. Best practice in knowledge translation indicates an integrated approach underpinned by a recognised conceptual framework and a sound plan that identifies the aims, stakeholders, main messages, and strategies, and includes evaluation measures. Using a knowledge translation framework and plan may assist the uptake of research evidence in the applied disability sector.

The full journal article can be found at:

Dew, A. & Boydell, K. M. (2017) Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. DOI: 10.1080/23297018.2017.1315610


Violence against women with disabilities: Is Australia meeting its human rights obligations

Australia has developed a National Disability Strategy and a National Plan of Action on Violence Against Women in response to its international human rights commitments. Neither the Strategy nor the Plan however appears to adequately address violence against women with disabilities. Violence disproportionately affects women with disabilities as they are uniquely vulnerable to forms of violence due to their specific living circumstances. By drawing upon feedback from the UN conventions committees, this article looks at Australia’s progress in meeting its international human rights obligations especially under the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and discusses the shortcomings in Australian domestic legislation and emerging policies in addressing issues of violence against women with disabilities.

The full journal article can be found at:

Didi, A., Soldatic, K, Frohmader, C. & Dowse, L. (2016). Australian Journal of Human Rights, 22(1), 159-177. DOI: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1323-238X.2016.11882162

Reports

Persons with Complex Needs who are Victims of Crime: Building evidence for responsive support

Dowse, L., Dean, K., Trofimovs, J., & Tzoumakis, S. (2013).

http://www.victimsclearinghouse.nsw.gov.au/Pages/research_fund/Victims-of-Crime-Research-Fund-2013.aspx

The report can also be found on the Victims of Crime Clearinghouse website.


A predictable and preventable path: Aboriginal people with mental and cognitive disabilities in the criminal justice system.

Baldry, E., McCausland, R., Dowse, L., & McEntyre, E. (2015).

https://www.mhdcd.unsw.edu.au/a-predictable-and-preventable-path-iamhdcd-report.html

Predictable and Preventable (Radio interview)

Professor Eileen Baldry speaks with Radio National.


A Sustainable Rural and Remote Workforce for Disability: Research to Action Guide, Rapid Review

Dew, A., Gilroy, J., & Lincoln, M. (2016).

Prepared for Centre for Applied Disability Research www.cadr.org.au

Summary

Review


Report on Knowledge Exchange Roundtable on Young People with Complex Support Need

Dowse, L., Didi, A., Boaden, N., Smith, L. & Dew, A. (2017).

Download the report

Download the report PDF (PDF) [1 Mb]

Submissions

Submission to the National Disability Insurance Scheme - Proposed Quality and Safeguarding Framework for the NDIS

Dowse, L. (2015).

Download here (PDF) [1 Mb].

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspectives on The Recurrent and Indefinite Detention of People with Cognitive and Psychiatric Impairment

2016

Download here (PDF) [1 Mb].

Submission to The Department of Social Services on the New Disability Employment Services from 2018 - Discussion Pape

Professor Eileen Baldry, Mark Bartlett, David Christian, A/ Professor Leanne Dowse, Professor Jane McGillivray, Dr Danielle Newton, Simone Rowe (2016).

Download here. (PDF) [176 Kb]