FMRN Seminar: Food and cultures of conviviality

When:29 May 2019, 10am - 12pm
Venue:UNSW Sydney, Room G4 Ground Floor Morven Brown Building
Who:Public event
Life in camp

Please join us for this upcoming seminar featuring presentations by Helen Greenwood, Writer, Reviewer and Editor, and Professor Susan Thompson, Head of the City Wellbeing Program in the City Futures Research Centre at UNSW.

The event will be chaired by Associate Professor Claudia Tazreiter, Co-convenor of the Forced Migration Research Network

Helen Greenwood, Writer + Reviewer + Editor, will present - "Recipe for Exile: how food writing creates space for conviviality and hospitality", a talk based on the works and lives of Claudia Roden and Charmaine Solomon

After 25 years as a journalist, reviewer, editor and feature writer, Helen Greenwood left The Sydney Morning Herald in 2012 and took up research on women food writers for a Master of Arts at the University of Sydney in Gender and Cultural Studies. Her thesis, Stirring Words: women and the making of modern food writing, employs frameworks of transnationalism and cultural hybridity, and the embodied intelligence of culinary practice. It argues that the works of women food writers are ethnographic explorations of culinary cultures. As well as having been a food journalist, she has taught food writing, and written and edited books on food.

Professor Susan Thompson, Head of the City Wellbeing Program in the City Futures Research Centre at UNSW, will present - "Nurturing our need to connect: food as a homemaker and cultural bridge".

Susan Thompson is Professor of Planning and Head of the City Wellbeing Program in the City Futures Research Centre, UNSW. With a foundation in public sector planning practice, Susan’s academic career encompasses both research and teaching in social and cultural planning, qualitative research methodologies and healthy built environments. She has had a career long interest in the relationship between people and place, initially focusing on homemaking and cultural diversity, and more recently, studying how our towns and cities impact on wellbeing as part of everyday living. Susan’s longstanding contributions to urban planning have been recognised by various awards, including the prestigious Sidney Luker Memorial Medal and the Australian Urban Research Medal.

Food and culture

If you have any questions please contact us on fmrn@unsw.edu.au.

Register