Professor Jeremy Moss

Professor of Political Philosophy
PhD, BA
School of Humanities & Languages

Contact

61 2 9385 2357
Room 320, Morven Brown
Kensington Campus
Fields: Applied Ethics, Environmental Philosophy, Political Theory and Political Philosophy
Tags: Climate change, Environmental Ethics, Social Ethics

Jeremy Moss's main research interests are in political philosophy and applied philosophy. Current research interests include projects on: climate justice, the ethics of renewable energy as well as the ethical issues associated with unconventional gas and fossil fuel exports. He has published several books including: Reassessing Egalitarianism, Climate Change and Social Justice, and Climate Change and Justice (forthcoming, Cambridge University Press). He is the recipient of the Eureka Prize for Ethics, the Australasia Association of Philosophy Media Prize and several Australian Research Council Grants including: A Future Fellowship on ‘Climate Justice’, ‘Egalitarian Approaches to Climate Justice’, ‘Health, Freedom and Equality’, and ‘Disability, Welfare and Work'. He is a member of the Australian Research Council College of Experts and has been a visitor at Oxford and McGill universities. 

 

Research

His main research interests are in political philosophy and applied philosophy. Current research interests include projects on: climate justice, the ethics of renewable energy as well as the ethical issues associated with unconventional gas and fossil fuel exports. He has published several books including: Reassessing Egalitarianism, Climate Change and Social Justice, and Climate Change and Justice (forthcoming, Cambridge University Press). He is the recipient of the Eureka Prize for Ethics, the Australasia Association of Philosophy Media Prize and several Australian Research Council Grants including: A Future Fellowship on ‘Climate Justice’, ‘Egalitarian Approaches to Climate Justice’, ‘Health, Freedom and Equality’, and ‘Disability, Welfare and Work'. He is a member of the Australian Research Council College of Experts and has been a visitor at Oxford and McGill universities. 

Prof Moss is part of the Practical Justice initiative in Arts & Social Sciences (Climate/Justice Stream), which has been funded through the University’s Strategic Priorities Fund.  

 

My current research is mainly concerned with topics in climate justice and egalitarianism.

 Several papers that are underway or in press include:

 

‘Exporting Harm’

The paper discusses whether countries who export fossil fuels ought to be liable for the harms caused by those fuels and whether exporting countries ought to count the associated emissions in their carbon budget.

 

‘The Morality of Divestment’

 In this paper I argue that the case for divestment is morally strong. Nonetheless, there is a plethora of arguments often used to support divestment, not all of which have equal strength. Moreover, it matters a great deal for the strength of the conclusions regarding divestment which of those arguments are employed.

 

‘Justice and Climate Transitions’

 This paper explores the specifically moral issues associated with a transition to a low carbon society. This dimension of our response to climate change is important if we are to avoid creating further injustices. Ethics and in particular considerations of justice, plays a crucial role in determining what the responses to climate change should be and in how we should evaluate such responses.

This paper is part of a conference on Justice and Climate Transitions.

http://paris-iea.fr/en/evenement/justice-and-climate-transitions

 

I am also interested in several topics within egalitarianism including:

‘Capabilities: Legitimate and Justified?’

This paper addresses some problems associated with how we select a list of capabilities that are suitable for a conception of justice. Broadly speaking there are two methods for selecting a list of capabilities. The first is the subjective approach discussed by Sen. This approach argues that what is on the list is a matter for people to decide for themselves. The second is the objective approach endorsed by Nussbaum and Anderson, which claims that there is an objective list of capabilities that constitute a good life for people. Neither approach seems entirely satisfactory. The problems facing either version of the capability approach are equally severe in their own way. I suggest a framework for how we can solve the  “selection problem”.

 

Some recent publications include:

J Moss, Reassessing Egalitarianism, Palgrave McMillan, 2015.

J.Moss, 'How to Value Equality', Philosophy Compass, Vol. 10/3, 2015.

J. Moss, A. Coram, G. Blashki, ‘Harms Unknown: Health uncertainties cast doubt on the role of unconventional gas in Australia's energy future’, Medical Journal of Australia, March 3, 2014.

J.Moss, ed., Climate Change and Justice, forthcoming, Cambridge University Press. 

Publications

    Books

    • Moss J, 2015, Climate Change and Justice, Cambridge University Press
    • Moss J, 2014, Reassessing Egalitarianism, Springer

    Book Chapters

    • Moss J, 2015, 'Introduction: Climate Justice', in Climate Change and Justice, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 1 - 16
    • Moss J, 2015, 'Exporting Harm', in Climate Change and Justice, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 73 - 88
    • Moss J, 2011, 'Freedom of Association', in Tham J (ed.), Electoral Regulation
    • Marston G;Moss J;Quiggin J, 2010, 'Introduction', in Marston G; Moss J; Quiggin J (ed.), Risk and Responsibility, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, pp. vii - xvi
    • Moss J, 2010, 'Two Conceptions of Risk', in Marston G; Moss J; Quiggin J (ed.), Risk and Responsibility, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, pp. 128 - 142
    • Moss J, 2010, 'Fencing and Philosophy', in Priest G; Young D (ed.), Martial Arts and Philosophy Beating and Nothingness, Open Court Publishing, pp. 211 - 217
    • Moss J, 2009, 'Climate Justice', in Moss J (ed.), Climate Change and Social Justice, Melbourne Univ. Publishing, Melbourne, pp. 51 - 67
    • Moss J, 1999, 'What is Equality?', in Laverty M (ed.), What's In An Issue?, Oxford University Press, Oxford

    Journal articles

    Conference Papers

    • Moss J;M. McGann ;K.White, 2016, ''Psycho-social Pathways to Poor Health: The Sociopsychological Impact of Insecure Work on Health and the Reproduction of Reduced Efficacy and self Esteem as Pathways to Poor Health',', in Work in Crisis: Work, Employment and Society Conference, Work in Crisis: Work, Employment and Society Conference, University of Leeds, presented at Work in Crisis: Work, Employment and Society Conference, University of Leeds, 06 - 08 September 2016
    • Moss J, 2015, 'Exporting Harm', in Exporting Harm, Our Common Future, Paris, presented at Our Common Future, Paris, 07 - 10 July 2015

    Reports

    • Moss J;Blashki G;Coram A, 2014, Wind Energy, Climate and Health: Evidence for the impacts of wind generated energy in Australia, Australia Institute, Canberra, 3
    • Moss J;Blashki G;Coram A, 2013, Solar Energy in Australia: Health and Environmental costs and benefits

    Conference Presentations

    • Moss, 2015, 'Justice and Climate Transitions', presented at Justice and Climate Transitions, 24 September - 25 March 2015

    Edited Books

    • 2012, Energy Equity and Environmental Security, Bangkok, UNESCO Publishing
    • 2010, Risk and Responsibility, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne
    • 2009, Climate Change and Social Justice, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne

Affiliations and membership

Australian Research Council College of Experts